Publications

Harrison M, Masci P, Campos JC, Curzon P.  2017.  The Specification and Analysis of Use Properties of a Nuclear Control System. The Handbook of Formal Methods in Human-Computer Interaction. Abstractp-00m-t6a.pdf

The chapter explores a layered approach to the analysis of the Nuclear Power Plant Control System described in Chapter 4. A model is specified to allow the analysis of use-centred properties based on generic templates. User interface properties include: the visibility of state attributes, the clarity of the mode structure and the ease with which an action can be recovered from. Property templates are used as heuristics to ease the construction of requirements for the control system interface.

Ruksenas R, Masci P, Curzon P.  2016.  Developing and Verifying User Interface Requirements for Infusion Pumps: A Refinement Approach. From Action Systems to Distributed Systems: The Refinement Approach. wp325.pdf
Bernardeschi C, Masci P, Santone A.  2018.  Data Leakage in Java applets with Exception Mechanism. Proceedings of Italian Conference on Cyber-Security (ITASEC18). CEUR Workshop Proceedings (2018, to appear)santone.pdf
Bernardeschi C, Masci P, Caramella D, Dell'Osso R.  2018.  The benefits of using interactive device simulations as training material for clinicians: an experience report with a contrast media injector used in CT. Medical Cyber Physical Systems Workshop 2018. SIGBED Review newsletter (2018, to appear)stellant-v3.pdf
Silva CC, Masci P, Zhang Y, Jones P, Campos JC.  2018.  A Use Error Taxonomy for Improving Human-Machine Interface Design in Medical Devices. Medical Cyber Physical Systems Workshop 2018. SIGBED Review newsletter (2018, to appear)mcps-taxonomy-v3g.pdf
Harrison M, Masci P, Campos JC, Curzon P.  2017.  Demonstrating that medical devices satisfy user related safety requirements. Software Engineering in Healthcare (FHIES/SEHC 2014). 9062 Abstractharrison-fhies14.pdf

One way of contributing to a demonstration that a medical device is acceptably safe is to show that the device satisfies a set of requirements known to mitigate hazards. This paper describes experience using formal techniques to model an IV infusion device and to prove that the modelled device captures a set of requirements. The requirements chosen for the study are based on a draft proposal developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A major contributor to device related errors are (user) interaction errors. For this reason the chosen models and requirements focus on user interface related issues.

Fayollas C, Martinie C, Palanque P, Masci P, Harrison M, Campos JC, Silva SR.  2017.  Evaluation of formal IDEs for human-machine interface design and analysis: the case of CIRCUS and PVSio-web. Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Formal Integrated Development Environment. 240:1-19. Abstract1701.08465.pdf

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Masci P, Zhang Y, Jones P, Campos JC.  2017.  A Hazard Analysis Method for Systematic Identification of Safety Requirements for User Interface Software in Medical Devices. 15th International Conference on Software Engineering and Formal Methods (SEFM 2017). LNCS, volume 10469, Springer Abstractsefm17-cameraready.pdf

Formal methods technologies have the potential to verify the usability and safety of user interface (UI) software design in medical devices, enabling significant reductions in use errors and consequential safety incidents with such devices. This however depends on comprehensive and verifiable safety requirements to leverage these techniques for detecting and preventing flaws in UI software that can induce use errors. This paper presents a hazard analysis method that extends Leveson's System Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) with a comprehensive set of causal factor categories, so as to provide developers with clear guidelines for systematic identification of use-related hazards associated with medical devices, their causes embedded in UI software design, and safety requirements for mitigating such hazards. The method is evaluated with a case study on the Gantry-2 radiation therapy system, which demonstrates that 1) as compared to standard STPA, our method allowed us to identify more UI software design issues likely to cause use-related hazards; and 2) the identified UI software design issues facilitated the definition of precise, verifiable safety requirements for UI software, which could be readily formalized in verification tools such as Prototype Verification System (PVS).

Harrison MD, Drinnan M, Campos JC, Masci P, Freitas L, Di Maria C, Whitaker M.  2017.  Safety analysis of software components of a dialysis machine using model checking. 14th International Conference on Formal Aspects of Component Software. Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) vol. 10487 Abstractpaper_7.pdf

The paper describes the practical use of a model checking technique to contribute to the risk analysis of a new paediatric dialysis machine. The formal analysis focuses on one component of the system, namely the table-driven software controller which drives the dialysis cycle and deals with error management. The analysis provided evidence of the verification of risk control measures relating to the software component. The paper describes the productive dialogue between the developers of the device, who had no experience or knowledge of formal methods, and an analyst who had experience of using the formal analysis tools. There were two aspects to this dialogue. The first concerned the translation of safety requirements so that they preserved the meaning of the requirement. The second involved understanding the relationship between the software component under analysis and the broader concern of the system as a whole. The paper focuses on the process, highlighting how the team recognised the advantages over a more traditional testing approach.

Palmieri M, Bernardeschi C, Masci P.  2017.  Co-simulation of semi-autonomous systems: the Line Follower Robot case study. 1st Workshop on Formal Co-Simulation of Cyber-Physical Systems (CoSim-CPS), LNCS Springer. 10729 Abstractcosim-cps-17_paper_4.pdf

Semi-autonomous systems are capable of sensing their environment and perform their tasks autonomously, but they may also be supervised by humans. The shared manual/automatic control makes the dynamics of such systems more complex, and undesirable and hardly predictable behaviours can arise from human-machine interaction. When these systems are used in critical applications, such as autonomous driving or robotic surgery, the identification of conditions that may lead the system to violate safety requirements is of main concern, since people actually entrust their life on them. In this paper, we extend an FMI-based co-simulation framework for cyber-physical systems with the possibility of modelling semi-autonomous robots. Co-simulation can be used to gain more insights on the system under analysis at early stages of system development, and to highlight the impact of human interaction on safety. This approach is applied to the Line Follower Robot case study, available in the INTO-CPS project.

Pinto M, Goncalves M, Masci P, Campos JC.  2017.  TOM: a Model-Based GUI Testing framework. 14th International Conference on Formal Aspects of Component Software. 10487 Abstractpaper_25.pdf

Applying model-based testing to interactive systems enables the systematic testing of the system by automatically simulating user actions on the user interface. It reduces the cost of (expensive) user testing by identifying implementations errors without the involvement of human users, but raises a number of specific challenges, such as how to achieve good coverage of the actual use of the system during the testing process. This paper describes TOM, a model-based testing framework that uses a combination of tools and mutation testing techniques to maximize testing of user interface behaviors

Bernardeschi C, Domenici A, Masci P.  2016.  Modeling Communication Network Requirements for an Integrated Clinical Environment in the Prototype Verification System. ICTS4eHealth - 1st IEEE Workshop on ICT solutions for eHealth. Abstractmasci-icts4ehealth-cr.pdf

Health care practices increasingly rely on complex technological infrastructure, and new approaches to the integration of information and communication technology in those practices lead to the development of such concepts as integrated clinical environments and smart intensive care units. These concepts refer to hospital settings where therapy relies heavily on inter-operating medical devices, supervised by clinicians assisted by advanced monitoring and coordinating software. In order to ensure safety and effectiveness of patient care, it is necessary to specify the requirements of such socio-technical systems in the most rigorous and precise way. This paper presents an approach to the formalization of system requirements for communication networks deployed in integrated clinical environment, based on the higher-order logic language of a theorem-proving environment, the Prototype Verification System. http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ISCC.2016.7543728

Fayollas C, Martinie C, Palanque P, Masci P, Harrison MD, Campos JC, Silva SR.  2016.  Evaluation of formal IDEs for human-machine interface design and analysis: the case of CIRCUS and PVSio-web. Workshop on Integrated Formal Development Environment (F-IDE 2016), co-located with FM2016. f-ide2016-camera-ready.pdf
Masci P, Oladimeji P, Zhang Y, Jones P, Curzon P, Thimbleby H.  2015.  PVSio-web 2.0: Joining PVS to Human-Computer Interaction. 27th International Conference on Computer Aided Verification (CAV2015). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 9206, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21690-4_30 Abstractpvsioweb-cav2015.pdf

PVSio-web is a graphical environment for facilitating the design and evaluation of interactive (human-computer) systems. Using PVSio-web, one can generate and evaluate realistic interactive prototypes from formal models. PVSio-web has been successfully used over the last two years for analyzing commercial, safety-critical medical devices. It has been used to create training material for device developers and device users. It has also been used for medical device design, by both formal methods experts and non-technical end users.

This paper presents the latest release of PVSio-web 2.0, which will be part of the next PVS distribution. The new tool architecture is discussed, and the rationale behind its design choices are presented